Closeup of a support hands

The Alzheimer Society discuss Dementia

What is dementia?

As time goes by we can all get a bit more forgetful, this is normal sign of the ageing process, for example, a trip to a different room in the house can sometimes leave you scratching your head as to what you were looking for. However, this is quite a normal part of the aging process and is nothing to worry about.  Just last week I was guilty of putting the remote for the TV and the fridge! ‘Its frustrating and can make you feel a bit silly, but it is often a sign.  of being busy is not a symptom of getting dementia

However, when should you start to worry ?. To be honest, whether it is yourself or a loved one that is causing concern, the Alzheimer’s Society offer  loads of information on its website that can help you decide.  As the population ages there has been an increase of people who need dementia care, and more information is important as soon we will all know someone who is battling with this disease.  We will be looking at issues surrounding Dementia, The issues it causes and the journey that people with it and their families cope

The word ‘dementia’ describes a set of symptoms that over time can affect memory, problem-solving, language and behaviour. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia.

  1. About dementia
  2. Types of dementia You can also read our information about dementia in accessible formats, including audio, Easy Read and British Sign Language.

About dementia

Dementia is a group of symptoms. It’s caused by different diseases that damage the brain. The symptoms get worse over time and include:

  • memory loss
  • confusion and needing help with daily tasks
  • problems with language and understanding
  • changes in behaviour.

Dementia is progressive, which means symptoms may be relatively mild at first, but they get worse over time. There are many types of dementia but Alzheimer’s disease is the most common. The next most common is vascular dementia.

What causes dementia?

Dementia is not a natural part of aging. It is caused when a disease damages nerve cells in the brain.

Nerve cells carry messages between different parts of the brain, and to other parts of the body. As more nerve cells are damaged, the brain becomes less able to work properly.

Dementia can be caused by many different diseases. These diseases affect the brain in different ways, resulting in different types of dementia.

Types of dementia

Around 19 out of 20 people with dementia have one of four main types. Dementia affects everyone differently, however each type has some common early symptoms.

A person may also have mixed dementia where they have symptoms of more than one type.

Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia. For most people, the first signs of Alzheimer’s are problems with their memory, thinking, language or perception.

Read our information on Alzheimer’s disease

What is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s disease?

Advice 

Dementia is a condition where problems with memory or other types of thinking make it hard for a person to do everyday activities by themselves. It can be caused by several different diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia .Dementia is a condition where problems with memory or other types of thinking make it hard for a person to do everyday activities by themselves. It can be caused by several different diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia….

Vascular dementia

Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia. Common early signs of vascular dementia include problems with planning or organising, making decisions or solving problems.

Read our information on vascular dementia 

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is caused by Lewy body disease. Symptoms of DLB include having difficulties staying focused, experiencing delusions, and problems with movement and sleep.

It is closely related to Parkinson’s disease.

Read our information on dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) 

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD)

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is one of the less common types of dementia. It is sometimes called Pick’s disease or frontal lobe dementia.

Read our information on frontotemporal dementia (FTD) 

Common symptoms of FTD include changes to personality and behaviour and/or difficulties with language.

Read our information on frontotemporal dementia (FTD) 

In conclusion the first port of call if you have any concerns about the above Is  go  to your or your  loved ones  GP  and ask to be tested . Once you are armed with correct diagnosis it can be a daunting prospect , but many people do find that they can cope and get the appropriate help as they go forward.

SIGN UP TO LIVING’S NEWSLETTER

Sign up to Staffordshire Living’s monthly newsletter by entering your email below and receive all the latest news, events, special offers and competitions direct to your inbox.
Will be used in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE